Franks: Iran Agreement is the "Definition of a Bad Deal"

Nov 24, 2013 Issues: National Security

WASHINGTON, D.C. - Speaking from Manila, Philippines, Congressman Trent Franks, Chair of the Congressional Israel Allies Caucus and author of the U.S.-Iran Nuclear Negotiations Act, reacted with alarm to President Obama’s stated agreement with Iran. According to Franks,

“In announcing this agreement, Mr. Obama said the ‘limitations…cut off Iran’s most likely paths to a bomb.’ Truly, the very definition of a bad deal is one in which Iran is not fully and unequivocally prevented from ultimately obtaining a nuclear weapons capability. And by Mr. Obama’s own admission, this plan does not entirely rule out such a scenario.

"Meanwhile, Iranian President Rouhani, who campaigned for the Iranian presidency on his record of building up Iran’s nuclear program, lauded the agreement, stating that it recognizes Iran’s ‘nuclear rights.’

“This accord amounts to Mr. Obama crossing his fingers and hoping that the world’s largest state sponsor of terrorism -- which has sent hundreds of thousands of child soldiers to their deaths, has armed the militants killing Americans abroad, and has called for the destruction of both Israel and the United States -- will behave reasonably.

"The deal President Obama has described will naively leave in place Iran's ability to enrich uranium as we predicted he would. This is the gravest of mistakes. Mr. Obama's track record on foreign policy is that of one failure after another. However, in this case the error may ultimately lead to a nuclear arms capable Iran and the world stepping into the shadow of nuclear terrorism. Posterity will hold this President culpable if that occurs.

"This agreement also immediately places Israel in the most untenable of positions. Mr Obama's political determination to make a deal with Iran at any cost, even if it endangers the peace and security of our closest allies as well as our children's future, will become apparent in the long run, and history will discover that the price the world may have to pay to deal with a nuclear-armed Iran in the future will far outweigh the price we could have paid to prevent the Islamic Republic of Iran from gaining nuclear weapons."